Advent and a political thriller

Ok….I admit I have started reading The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest before finishing Eleven Minutes by Paulo Coehlo.

I gave in the day I went to pick up my math book for practice and of course it was 20% off, they made it attractive and all of a sudden my longing to finish the trilogy kicked in and I was ready. I had waited a good amount of time, trying to discipline myself to not rush ahead! I have less than 20 pages to the end of Eleven Minutes, so the ending of my almost fourth novel by Paulo and the beginning of the third novel by Steig awaits me in the next few weeks.

So while Advent proceeds; which means the coming of something or someone significant I read a political thriller and a “An adults only fairy tale” says the Washington Post of Eleven Minutes. There are other books I am enjoying which help me to enter into the winter season, this beginning of a new year that urges me to be in the present while preparing for the future….

see: …I gave

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The sound of aluminum

Since the new dock went up and the permanent pylons forever cast in the ground, there has been a new sound at Garry Point of an unwelcome nature.

It is the sound of the swaying aluminum ramp as the waves from a sailing vessel sweep under. It stands alone and is rather reminiscent of something you want to put down in order to let it out of its misery.

Without a warm characteristic hum or drone, it is like a horribly out of tune instrument that does not know quite how to fit in.

“As a musician for over 40 years I have heard a lot of ugly sounds in my life time, from ear piercing microphone feedback through a 500 watt P.A. system, to out of tune instruments playing out of time.

I must say however the offensive squawk of the Garry Point Aluminum bridge is now included in my top ten list. Walking down the bridge slowly gave me the creepy feeling that I was walking through a gauntlet of GIANT and very angry crows.

Standing in the base of the bridge made me think of what aluminum might sound like if it had flatulence…”Aluminum Flatulence,” also a good name for a “Light Metal Band”. Standing on the float the squawks created a vision in my mind of a very LARGE Siamese cat in heat. From the middle of the Park the squawks sounded more like squeaks.These squeaks introduced an image in my mind of an older upstairs couple copulating very slowly and carefully on a broken box spring mattress.

I hope any one who reads this will now see these images in their mind as well, when their ears are assaulted. Lets hope that City Council doesn’t promote the bridge as Steveston tourist attraction.”—Ted Hesketh, Musician and Visual Artist

I am hoping that as long as I live close enough to hear the waves, the dredger and working tugs that it will blend into the milieu of industrial sounds that I daily listen to, yet somehow I have a feeling it is going to take awhile.

If it were possible I wish to find a way of tuning it to give it a slightly more appealing voice which harmonizes with the natural sounds of Garry Pt. Maybe now that I am working at Action Welding I can learn from Jim all the secrets to working with aluminum. Come to think of it, I don’t think they make tuning forks out of aluminum, hmm, then again maybe they do.

Aluminum is characteristically somewhat hollow and lightweight depending on the weight of it and a premium metal for marine fabrication, many years ago dubbed “the miracle metal” by those working in the industry. There may well be a few instruments out there, I’ll get back to you on that!

ps: I did find a beautiful double bass…

Available at: 1stdibs

Metal madness

“It was something about the material that I wanted so desperately to mold hold and make into something that would be nothing short of supernatural. It was a sensation and I lost in metal madness surmised that everything up to this point was fought for, the excitement was nothing new. Fire sparks—noise—toxic odour—danger—behind the door of a shop studio grabbed hold of me and I bloody well couldn’t shake it. I had to give in and submit every morning. I put my ring on faithfully as a reminder that the day held opportunity that was mine to discover—hammer—weld grind, until I would find the shape that presented a symmetry that was laid to rest on the table until tomorrow’s tomorrow” —Freyja~Frigg

Next up:

Feature Story: Amy J. Steele, Metal Artist….Coming Soon….

NEW! see Feature Story

Jackie Lundman, Woman Welder

Underground shifting

At a cafe today in our Village, I was catching up with online digital tasks since the last two weeks I have been driving off Lulu Island to Annacis Island to attend piabschool. POW is a program for women who are interested in the trades. PIAB, UA 170‘s private school provides an opportunity for women to succeed in a career of their choice within the piping industry by offering excellent training in a supportive working environment in an industry where only 4% are women. From the get go I knew I wanted to weld. I still have 4 weeks to go and everyday I ask myself: is this what I want to study and work at in the years to come?

At Bean and Beyond in Steveston, in between checking websites and waiting for data transfer I read ART revolution by Lisa L. Cyr where she writes about transcending boundaries:

“From 1908-1914 two pioneers; Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque worked collaboratively in search of an alternative form of expression, a different approach to seeing and interpreting the world. With their efforts, Cubism, an artistic vision that allows for multiple  viewpoints to be shown simultaneously, was born…..In addition the Cubist movement gave birth to a more tactile approach to picture-making….under Cubist theory, pictorial reality became multidimensional expressed in multimedia format.”

I used to chide myself severely for not ever settling on a particular medium. It seemed I could not quell the desire to join together numerous elements to make a picture. I understood Marcel Duchamp‘s, Nude Descending Staircase since I had experienced fragmentation, culminating in 10 moves by the time I was 13. So Marcel’s depiction captured well-known feelings that I had contained for most of my childhood. That life was dubious and unstable accompanied by a haunting notion of unpredictability.  Searching for meaning in a world of chance occupied me which later helped develop full-blown existentialism that I chose as my world view for a period of time.

Underground shifting is about perceptives in motion where things are placed in a random order to create something new or unknown. It is subjective to the last degree which is largely what gives it appeal. I end up feeling that when change occurs in life it might look somewhat like this. Non-sensical and heavy laden with meaning and nothing in particular at the same time, it is somewhat unsettling as change occurs and often mentally painful.

With 13 other women I sit in the shape of a circle to redefine or refine a path, a way that I have been going. There are individuals I have met at the school that have given me a strong sense of wanting justice in the labour movement for men and women and have acted according to their convictions to achieve lasting change. I am challenged and inspired to look further than my immediate path by listening to a person’s story.

At the end of the day it may not all make sense like Underground shifting yet what is important is to stay on the path even if you are on the loose shoulder slipping a little. Eventually you will notice an order occurring and you will hit a point when you see clearly an isometric design in the midst of frayed disorder.

The Phoenix