Live dangerously in a small Village

The title might insight you to think of the bygone days of youth when you were free spirited and did not think about the consequences of your choices or actions.

The phrase was spoken to me as I crossed the fancy intersection at No. 1 Road and Moncton. It was just the two of us there, even though there are eight different ways to cross we just happened to be crossing on the same side at a specific moment. He was a ‘come from away’ or cfa as they say in Nfld. Not of the Vil, just a visitor. He had a favorite cafe that he frequented and now he was crossing on the red hand, before the white man appeared.

I hesitated. Looking at the lights, the corners, the myriad ways before me of crossing one of my favorite intersections.

“Oh go on, he said, live dangerously” “Yes …. yes in a small Village!” I chimed in. We laughed and wished each other a good day

It got me thinking about living dangerously.

To look at a stranger, greet someone whom you don’t know with a smile, or look a person straight in the eye and say, hello, how are you, really, tell me. This isn’t living dangerously, or is it? It is a common occurrance, a kindness given.

ImageOn the subject of welding, I came to the conclusion that although it is ‘dangerous’ as a job and pursuit, I put it on the same level as mothering and caring about people. I think to live dangerously is to care about people since it requires the most from us.

I am learning the only way to make a good join that is industructible is to pay close attention to every angle, to the placement of the weld bead, travel speed and correct amp temperature coupled with a immense steady patience that gives you enough time to run the length of the rod into the metal are some key components. I make parellels between the two realms for the reason that I know about mothering and caring for people.

I see a similarity where the inherent commitment involved in bearing and caring for a family like learning the trade of welding, is nothing short of life threatening and unpredictable.

A film that portrays this well and is worth viewing at least twice — the second time with the Director’s comments, is Ron Howard‘s, Cinderella Man based on the true story of the famous boxer and family man James R. Braddock, it is truly a remarkable story which gave me hope and inspiration in these last weeks. Happy Canada Day to you, your family and those you care for in your community. ~e

Monsters spawn in the darkness

Kagen was busy revealing to me the secrets of Minecraft (not just a game for hipsters) all in a matter of seconds before he set off for school one morning.

The title of the post is what he said nonchalantly in a manner only an 11 year old can; not being concerned, nor displaying any anxiety, he proceeded to introduce me to the monsters.

Go to the mobs section, you will need some time in order to understand the passive, neutral and hostile characters.

Be fore warned, only go the the sandbox if you have some time, not just for a view because likely you will not get out of the wiki space before lunchtime if you visit on your coffee break. The phrase tweeked my interest and cued me to think of various kinds of monsters I have become acquainted with.

They go under the modern names of depression, ocd and anxiety.


I do not sneeze at any goodness that may come my way in the form of many fine small gestures throughout the day because monsters that spawn in darkness shrink back from certain brightness. I choose to play the game of life while I very nearly regularly encounter un-foreseen monsters that dare present themselves in light of day, those are the trickiest ones! Alas after a while, whether hours or days or weeks pass the monsters are swept up and deposited into a bin where they are not recycled.

Like Susan of Narnia, I aim to point my arrow straight at them. Most diminish fast at the sight; others are more stubborn and can only be dealt with by special weapons and tactical. Nevertheless I am given a chance to practice my hand eye coordination.

I have liked to play darts for a long time since arriving in Vancouver in the mid 80’s when John Ottmann and I searched for just the right ones to begin practicing with. Not until many years later did I pick up the darts again. At local pubs I had to make do with broken ones. Some nights I would just go there and throw and throw until I could not anymore. All I wanted to do was hit as close to the centre as I could. I was not thinking of anyone, nor was I fantasizing about individuals while throwing darts. Although the feeling of nailing the mark gave deep satisfaction.

My point is that practice makes good and perfect for you. If not on the mark then very near it which has its own kind of pleasure. That practice of vanquishing the monsters that spawn in the darkness calls for a victorious celebration, every time. When practiced, you are strong becoming stronger. Though the slippery slope of falling into a ravine is a very real possibility, the ground on which one stands soon is still and even because you’ve been standing and keeping on regardless of the ravines to your left and right for quite sometime. I do not attribute my small successes to my ‘keeping on’, although it helps my self esteem!

I attribute it largely to the One who charts my path.

Laser welding vs spot welding

03.03.12

Welding School on Anacis Island will be my destination from 03.03.12 full time for 6-9 months ~ff

I have been working

….steadily at learning the shop environ where of utmost importance and priority is safety for a tradesman or tradeswoman who should rarely be injured because what comes first is a ‘focused concentration’ for the task at hand regardless whether the effort required is great or small ‘we’ have a moral responsibility to respect the equipment and how we as artists/trades people and fellow workers inter act with the equipment at the beginning I really didn’t know how I would fair yet now I feel I am gaining some comfort if you can imagine working in a place that is darker than a room with natural light and heated in one of three rooms in winter….

When the garage door goes up and daylight comes streaming into the shop it is a reward like the hot zing of candied ginger on your tongue ….there is a palpable sense of accomplishment after having worked three hours in the morning and a few more in the afternoon the next best thing to do is build in a little ‘bounty’ in order to honour the physical work accomplished and the sense of feeling productive towards the end of the day is much like the rising of small bubbles to the surface now you can take a breather or two and feel somewhat complete and done although seven or more projects still await their end we press on while deadlines loom large clients call expectant of results after they have placed their trust in your ability to fabricate and assemble a useable commodity it is your assignment to deliver whether you are winning all along or fall down too many times to count. —Freyja Frigg

Advent and a political thriller

Ok….I admit I have started reading The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest before finishing Eleven Minutes by Paulo Coehlo.

I gave in the day I went to pick up my math book for practice and of course it was 20% off, they made it attractive and all of a sudden my longing to finish the trilogy kicked in and I was ready. I had waited a good amount of time, trying to discipline myself to not rush ahead! I have less than 20 pages to the end of Eleven Minutes, so the ending of my almost fourth novel by Paulo and the beginning of the third novel by Steig awaits me in the next few weeks.

So while Advent proceeds; which means the coming of something or someone significant I read a political thriller and a “An adults only fairy tale” says the Washington Post of Eleven Minutes. There are other books I am enjoying which help me to enter into the winter season, this beginning of a new year that urges me to be in the present while preparing for the future….

see: …I gave

Oh Rebecca