MEET UP TO ORGANIZE FOR NO TANKERS


As a recently certified welder, I have been thinking deeply about my own choices of what kind of work I want to apply for. I am certified as a ‘structural welder’ by the Canadian Welding Bureau which boasts the highest standards when it comes to structural welding. I can choose to work with any small or large company that have need for welders to weld things together for good!

For example, I have applied to work as a welder for maintenance of BC Ferries, another example would be working with Marine Worker’s Union No.1 for a company that belongs to under the banner of Seaspan. Working in the shipyards would be a unique experience and one that I would welcome. Everyday in the news we hear about Port Expansion and development, I am learning about these issues, about our economy and where the jobs are for British Columbians.

There are three reasons I chose to go into welding. To use the skill of welding in the field of art, to apply it to creating public art and to work with other artists. The second reason I chose it is to have the ability to make more than ‘the living wage’ (which is 18.00/hr). The third and last reason, is that I wanted to challenge myself personally, to learn a practical skill that I could build on and get better at by practice. I look forward to working within the marine environment and hope to use the certification that I worked hard to attain. 

I am supporting the Dogwood Initiative because I will be a part of helping to conserve and preserve the Fraser River Estuary, the wetlands and marshes, and the coastline in general. I have decided that conservation is more important than development and prosperity. At the same time, I think that we can have a decent balance between the two. In the weeks ahead up to election day, I hope to have ongoing conversations with friends, neighbours and co-workers to further educate myself and continue to consider the near future, to understand what expansion and development means for BC’s coastline, so I can make informed choices for my livelihood for the environment and future generations.

Live dangerously in a small Village

The title might insight you to think of the bygone days of youth when you were free spirited and did not think about the consequences of your choices or actions.

The phrase was spoken to me as I crossed the fancy intersection at No. 1 Road and Moncton. It was just the two of us there, even though there are eight different ways to cross we just happened to be crossing on the same side at a specific moment. He was a ‘come from away’ or cfa as they say in Nfld. Not of the Vil, just a visitor. He had a favorite cafe that he frequented and now he was crossing on the red hand, before the white man appeared.

I hesitated. Looking at the lights, the corners, the myriad ways before me of crossing one of my favorite intersections.

“Oh go on, he said, live dangerously” “Yes …. yes in a small Village!” I chimed in. We laughed and wished each other a good day

It got me thinking about living dangerously.

To look at a stranger, greet someone whom you don’t know with a smile, or look a person straight in the eye and say, hello, how are you, really, tell me. This isn’t living dangerously, or is it? It is a common occurrance, a kindness given.

ImageOn the subject of welding, I came to the conclusion that although it is ‘dangerous’ as a job and pursuit, I put it on the same level as mothering and caring about people. I think to live dangerously is to care about people since it requires the most from us.

I am learning the only way to make a good join that is industructible is to pay close attention to every angle, to the placement of the weld bead, travel speed and correct amp temperature coupled with a immense steady patience that gives you enough time to run the length of the rod into the metal are some key components. I make parellels between the two realms for the reason that I know about mothering and caring for people.

I see a similarity where the inherent commitment involved in bearing and caring for a family like learning the trade of welding, is nothing short of life threatening and unpredictable.

A film that portrays this well and is worth viewing at least twice — the second time with the Director’s comments, is Ron Howard‘s, Cinderella Man based on the true story of the famous boxer and family man James R. Braddock, it is truly a remarkable story which gave me hope and inspiration in these last weeks. Happy Canada Day to you, your family and those you care for in your community. ~e

Post 50 RrDh 042811

Random reality strikes when you least expect

An artist at the Blue Canoe watched cbc

A celebration televised Danielle Hebert …. there she was, dirty and drenched from riding her BMW bike named ‘Beowulf’ every day all over the lower mainland. A discovery in her Dreams of fish and fishing on the Fraser River at Garry Pt was where history hit her square between the eyes and this became her inspiration on Lulu Island.

There, remnants of metal, money and music deepened into a mystery akin to nature

New Westminster would play a leading role and a potato from Richmond of all things! She reckoned society was ignorant of her sons while she traveled on the bus reading Steig Larsson’s, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Steveston was far away. She gazed out the window noticing the industrial landscape and laughed ….

Amidst Tubular and oddly shaped scrap metal she saw a unicyle beside a vegetable pile, close to WA Farms yet so far from the Wetlands.

visible and invisible

just showing you the beginning of this funky thing because im getting my mind around working with the most hazardous and poisionous materials ive ever touched but then working with humans is much more dangerous this metal is softer than you can imagine—human flesh is harder

in looking after babies boys and brothers one builds up immunity a callous for the betterment of soul and body

so what im saying is in your softness become tough in your beauty become rough in your heart make art

use beauty to heal not harm

Hope dawns eternal